Networking in the Hospitality Industry

In the hospitality industry and nearly every other field, networking is an extremely important tool in advancing one’s career. One of the most effective ways to network is to attend conferences and conventions that pertain to your field where you can see new innovations, learn about best practices, and most importantly, speak with professionals in the industry that can be potential contacts that can be useful in the future.

When looking for conferences to attend, one useful method for finding these events is to look to leading associations and organizations in the field who usually host or at least have a large presence at these events. For example, in the hospitality industry, the National Restuarant Association (NRA) and the Hospitality Financial and Technology Professionals (HFTP) are two large associations in this field.

The HFTP hosts many conferences throughout the year and also co-hosts many other events. These conferences are great for anyone wishing to break into the hotel and tourism industry and especially learn about new technologies that help those in that industry.

The NRA hosts a variety of events including summits and other conferences that are more focused on the restaurant industry. These events and this association, in general, is a great networking tool for those wishing to enter the field of restaurant management.

When it comes to networking in any industry, start by finding associations that have a large presence and seek out the conferences and events they host or co-host. The networking gained at these events can go a long way in advancing your career.

-Thomas Skowronski

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Processes in the food and beverage industry.

Within the quick service sector of the food and beverage industry, their seems to be two prevailing processes when it comes to taking a customer’s order, filling that order, and accepting payment. The order of these steps can change the way a customer perceives a restaurant and can influence revenue directly.

The most common version of this process includes recording the customer’s order, accepting payment, then filling the order. This process can be seen in many major fast food chains and seems to be the most efficient way to conduct this process however there are other options that can change the tone of the order taking process entirely.

Another, slightly less popular method for this process is to first take the customer’s order, then fill the order, then accept payment at the end of the process. This is more useful in situations where an order requires a lot of customization and options that do not influence the price of a product. This can also lead to less perceived waiting time because the customer is constantly engaged in the food making process thus, making the time seem to pass more quickly.

Each of these methods has their strengths and weaknesses in certain situations which are why there is no single best method for this process. The main tradeoff seems to be in the amount of perceived waiting time versus the actual waiting time where the first method usually has less actual waiting time and the second method usually has less perceived waiting time.

– Thomas Skowronski